Bristol’s “Elder Island” Are Sure to Turn Heads

Bristol’s “Elder Island” Are Sure to Turn Heads

Lately, I can’t help but find myself struggling for a sound that stops me in my tracks, even with the plethora of fresh artistry fighting to make their mark on the scene. It seems like the motivation to succeed nowadays results in the same old hackneyed sound that dominates the mainstream music scene. But in the midst of the struggle, there was a light that presented itself. And that light is Elder Island. Bristol’s Elder Island is an eccentric trio (made up of Katy Sargent, David Havard and Luke Thornton) that manages to combine hauntingly husky female vocals with minimalistic electronics and guitars to create a beautiful cathartic atmosphere for the listener. Their debut self-titled EP touched down last summer and it features debut singles “What’s It Worth” and “The Big Unknown,” in which both are continuing to rack up plays into this new year. Although the clap-friendly “What’s It Worth” is sure to send you, willingly, into an embarrassing karaoke belting and dancing session, it’s the jazz-infected vocals and harmony in “The Big Unknown” begging you to explore the undiscovered that floored me upon first listen and still holds its spot as my favorite track by them. The first track on their EP, “Today is Your Day,” is a close second with its gorgeous tribal accents due to the dramatic use of percussion throughout. Overall, the female vocalist’s raspy, well-annunciated style backed by the savory voices of her male counterparts is one of many aspects that make this EP a stunningly worthwhile experience. They truly seem to work so well together, breaking into the music scene with this...
Show Review: Years & Years at Le Poisson Rouge (NYC)

Show Review: Years & Years at Le Poisson Rouge (NYC)

March 31st 2015 Lower Manhattan Years & Years is a British electropop trio that I’ve been following for the past year. And looking back, it is simply unreal how their popularity has blossomed, having yet to release a full LP. I ventured up to Lower Manhattan on Tuesday night to attend their sold out show at Le Poisson Rouge. This was actually a very special show because it was only advertised to the victims of their previously cancelled show in January due to inclement weather. The first thing I noticed when I arrived was the sea of happy young fans wearing Burger King crowns disguised by the Y&Ys EP artwork. This was in support of their current single, “King”. The set was due to start by 10pm after 3 hours of house DJs spinning this season’s current favorites. However, they didn’t hit the stage until 10:30, leaving the crowd in quite an anxious state. Adorable front-man, Olly, stepped out in his minimalistic attire while Mikey and Emre settled in at their synth base camps and their touring drummer, Dylan, hovered over his drum kit in anticipation. They began the show with a unheard ballad called “Foundation” that beautifully transitioned in “Take Shelter,” which set the crowd into an unavoidable uproar of bliss and hip sways. I did notice throughout the set that Olly was visibly tired and lacked a bit of his infectious smile. It wasn’t until he said “I am a bit ill, but I am so happy to see you guys” that the reason became clear. I also noticed that Mikey and Emre seemed to be very...
Tora Creates a Thought-Provoking Atmosphere

Tora Creates a Thought-Provoking Atmosphere

The electronic music scene is a scene built on collaboration between fellow artists and the reinterpretation of another’s creation. And it’s my love for electronic music and my obsession with Galiamatis’s remix of their track ‘Jaigantic’ that has lead me into the arms of Tora. These Australian lads first hit the scene late 2013, testing the waters with one of their gateway tracks “Captivate” guaranteed to take the listener on an amazingly simplistic and chillwave journey guided by heavily accented vocals. It’s quite apparent by indulging in their latest EP, “Eat The Sun”, that these boys have grown to experiment with more sound effects and sampling, increasing their chilling creativity and the intended thought-provoking atmosphere. Their first track “Sugar Snap” is a beautifully clever and alluring piece that captures the reluctance to fall victim to seduction. The melodic guitar riff throughout the track holds as a strong foundation while the synthesizers and bass snuggle in right beside it giving the ultimate post R&B warm and fuzzy feeling. But I have to say that their title track, “Eat The Sun”, stands out the most. It features mysterious and intriguing sound samples, in which its origins I have yet to put my finger on. I would highly recommend listening to this track with high-definition headphones so you could truly appreciate the varying textures and tones that make up this musical journey towards aurora. Not to mention the tempo change that oddly adds to the musicians’ creditability, as not many are able to pull that off as smooth. Tora is a very young band in the early stages of success and they...